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van-pelt2The Rezeau-Van Pelt Cemetery is located near the intersection of Tysen Court and Center Street, just west of the Third County Courthouse, on the original site where it was established in the 1780s (decades before the courthouse was built). It is a small homestead graveyard, the type of family burial plot that was once commonly found on private property. It has ten small headstones and one larger monument with a molded arched pediment.

The iron fence around the cemetery replicates an original fence built ca. 1850. It features decorative ironwork with sculptural details. A gate on the south side has a large angel's head with radiating beams of light, as well as tassels and a plaque naming "C.R. Van Pelt." The fence's crossbars are marked with winged hourglasses. The corner posts are topped with draped urns, another funerary symbol.

This private cemetery was used by families that occupied the structure now known as the Voorlezer's House. It was part of an 80 acre parcel owned by Rene Rezeau and passed to descendents with the names of Van Pelt and Wheatley. In 1854 surrounding land, excluding the cemetery, was sold by Cavalier Van Pelt to Richard Tysen. The cemetery does not appear on maps of the area until the 1911 Sanborn Atlas and the 1911 Topographic Map.

Individual graves include Wyntje (or Wyntjie) Rezeau Johnson (died 1788 at age 43), Richard Johnson, husband of Wyntje (died 1815 at age 79), Richard Johnson, son of Wyntje (died at age 14), and Jacob Rezeau (headstone 1789), father of Wyntje.

The large monument erected in memory of John A. and Susannah Van Pelt (who died in 1826 and 1863, respectively) was inscribed: "...granddaughter of Jacob Rezeau Senr. And the last of five generations interred in this burying ground. They were Huguenots, who left France when persecuted for their religion; settled in this neighborhood. They selected this spot for their last resting place on earth. Sacred be their dust."

The Landmarks Preservation Commission of New York City designated this small cemetery as a landmark in 1969. Restoration work on the fence and monuments ca. 2003 was made possible by State Senator John J. Marchi; Staten Island Historical Society; and New York City, Department of Cultural Affairs.

Main Village - Structures

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  • The Third County Courthouse is located on Center Street at the head of Court Place. It was built in 1837 on this site, replacing earlier courthouse buildings that had been located on other sites nearby. Standing on one of the
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  • The Historical Museum is the former County Clerk's and Surrogate's office for Richmond County. It is a large brick structure in its original location on Center Street at the corner of Court Place. Its architecture features decorative bracketed eaves of
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  • The Edwards-Barton House remains on its original site on Richmond Road at the corner of Court Place, where it was constructed in 1869. The house was built for Webley J. Edwards (1816-1870) and his wife Deborah (Mercereau) Edwards (1823-1888). Before
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  • This privy (outhouse) now stands in the yard behind the Edwards-Barton House on Richmond Road. It originally stood on the property of the Jacob Crocheron House at its original location in Woodrow. At 12 feet wide, it is unusually large
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  • The Guyon Store is on its original site, on the south side of Richmond Road between Arthur Kill Road and Court Place. It was probably built ca. 1819 or 1820.  It is a simple two-story clapboard building with a one-story
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  • This structure is a coursed stone foundation for a barn. It was built by the staff at Historic Richmond Town in the area bounded by Center Street, Arthur Kill Road, and Richmond Road. It is appropriate for an early 19th-century
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  • The Town Pond was once located south of Richmond Road just east of Arthur Kill Road. Its existence is documented in the early 18th century, when Richmond was established as the county seat. The pond was likely drained and filled
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  • The establishment of a Richmond County jail was provided for by an Act of Assembly in 1704. This site was selected and construction was undertaken in 1710, with orders that the building be built of stone, two stories high, measuring
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  • In 1769, the Reformed Dutch Church built an edifice on what is now the corner of Center Street and Arthur Kill Road (not far from the Voorlezer's House which had been its meeting house in the previous century). This church
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  • The Parsonage is located on its original site on Arthur Kill Road at the corner of Clarke Avenue. It was built in 1855 as home for the pastor of the Dutch Reformed Church (now demolished) that once stood nearby. The
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  • The Annadale Railroad Station is now located north of Clarke Avenue and east of Arthur Kill Road. It was moved to Historic Richmond Town in 1975 from a location on Annadale Road in Annadale. The building has an unusual history.
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  • This railroad station, which once served the neighborhood of New Dorp, now stands on the south side of Center Street near Tysen Court. Its original location was near Rose Avenue and 6th Street (now New Dorp Plaza). It was built
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  • This structure was constructed for location filming of the television series Boardwalk Empire. It represents a 1920s American diner in the fictional town of Tabor Heights, New Jersey. This set was utilized for episodes which originally aired during the show’s
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  • The Rezeau-Van Pelt Cemetery is located near the intersection of Tysen Court and Center Street, just west of the Third County Courthouse, on the original site where it was established in the 1780s (decades before the courthouse was built). It
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  • The lawn between P.S. 28 and the Third County Courthouse is now used for visitor picnicking and outdoor concerts at Historic Richmond Town. But in earlier years, a house stood here, at 284 Center Street. The house was erected in
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