Seaman Cottage #22

This house was built ca. 1836-1837 by developer Henry I. Seaman. It was originally on the south side of Center Street between St. Patrick's Place and Moore Street. It is now situated on the north side of Center Street between Court Place and St. Patrick's Place.

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Sarah Hermann
Tinsmith Shop (Colon Store) #23

The Colon Store, also known as the Tinsmith’s Shop, is on the north side of Center Street between St. Patrick’s Place and Court Place. Built ca. 1840-1850, the store originally stood on Woodrow Road in Woodrow. Around 1913 it was relocated to Bloomingdale Road in Pleasant Plains. It was moved to Historic Richmond Town in 1969.

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Sarah Hermann
Stephens-Black House #24

The house was built for Stephen Dover Stephens (1808-1883), a merchant, and his wife Elizabeth Johnson Stephens (1811-1883). The family resided in Northfield, Staten Island, before building their house in Richmond. In 1837 they purchased the land for their house from Henry I. Seaman, a prominent Staten Islander who in 1836 began to enlarge and develop the village of Richmond.

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Sarah Hermann
General Store #25

The General Store, located at its original site on Court Place, is attached to the rear of the Stephens-Black House. It is a rectangular structure of one story with an attic. It was constructed in stages beginning ca. 1840, but most of the structure was demolished in the 1940s. It was restored and reconstructed by Historic Richmond Town in 1964.

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Sarah Hermann
Print Shop (Eltingville Store) #26

The Eltingville Store, once located on Amboy Road in Eltingville, is now presented as the Print Shop in its location on Court Place at Historic Richmond Town. It is a small one-room, one-story wood frame building with board-and-batten siding and a wood shingle roof.

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Sarah Hermann
Carpenter Shop #27

The Carpenter's Shop on the east side of Court Place is a reconstruction built primarily with historic building materials. The framing for the building is from the ca. 1830 kitchen wing of the Samuel Decker house. Since the wing did not have an end wall where it had originally joined the main house, new posts made of old timbers were added, and it was sided with shingles from the ca. 1790 Eith house on Richmond Avenue. A variety of other historic and new materials were used to complete the reconstruction; the historic materials were salvaged from old Staten Island buildings that had been demolished.

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Sarah Hermann
Bennett House #28

The Bennett House is located on its original site, on Court Place at the corner of Richmond Road. The main structure was erected ca. 1839, and an addition to the rear of the house was built ca. 1854. It is a clapboarded residence with a high four-columned porch and an above-grade basement with a large brick oven extending from the southern side of the building.

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Sarah Hermann
Journeay Privy #29

This privy (outhouse) was built about 1865. It presently stands on the brick foundation of the original Stephens-Black House privy, behind the house and store at the corner of Center Street and Court Place.

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Sarah Hermann
Schwiebert House #30

The Schwiebert House is a local expression of the Colonial Revival style, executed in brick, with classical porch columns topped with Ionic capitals. The Schwiebert House was built 1909-1910 as the home of John Frederick Schwiebert, his wife Anna Schwiebert, and their children. John F. Schwiebert (1861- 1944) came to America from Germany in 1881, and worked as a foreman in the Marsh and Nolan Carriage Factory in Richmond.

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Sarah Hermann
Site of Carriage Manufactory #31

A carriage and wagon manufactory formerly stood on Richmond Road between Arthur Kill Road and St. Patrick’s Place. Currently, a foundation and partial walls stand on the site, built of fieldstone and brick. These are the result of 1970s construction upon the remains of an early fieldstone foundation wall. The original structure was a plain, utilitarian three-story brick building with a stone ground floor foundation.

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Sarah Hermann
Crocheron House #32

The house is a wood frame structure built ca. 1819-1820. It is a large one and one-half story gambrel-roofed farmhouse with dormers and full-width porches front and back. The roof has spring eaves over the porches, supported by wood columns

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Sarah Hermann
Guyon-Lake-Tysen House #33

The Guyon-Lake-Tysen House is unusually large by 18th-century Staten Island standards and represents a substantial, prosperous way of life. It was constructed as a farmhouse and was used as such for most of its history. It was situated in an area of large, fertile farm plots of substantial acreage.


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Sarah Hermann
Basket Maker's House #34

This house was built ca. 1810.  It is a simple, one and one-half story wood frame building with a rubble stone basement.  Its original location was on Richmond Avenue in New Springville.  It was moved to Historic Richmond Town in 1965.  The architecture is vernacular in style, with Dutch and Flemish influences. 

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Sarah Hermann
Britton Cottage #35

The Britton Cottage is a one and one-half story fieldstone and wood frame farmhouse. The center section of the house dates to ca. 1670. Two additions were built ca. 1760, and a lean-to was added prior to 1840.

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Sarah Hermann
Kruser-Finley House #36

The Kruser-Finley House is set back from the north side of Richmond Road, east of the intersection with Richmond Hill Road. It was originally located in nearby Egbertville, on the south side of Richmond Road (once known as Black Horse Road), east of Hitchcock Avenue. It was moved to Historic Richmond Town in 1965.

The Kruser-Finley House is a 1 ½ story clapboard residence with a fieldstone foundation and an unfinished basement. It is composed of two sections; the newer, eastern section is lower in height and is sided with shingles. It was built ca. 1790, with additions ca. 1820 and ca. 1840-1890.

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Sarah Hermann
Dunn's Mill #37

Dunn's Mill was one of eleven mills that operated on Staten Island during the 1700s and 1800s. It was situated by the Richmond Creek, across the road from St. Andrew's Church. John Dunn purchased the land in 1795, and began operating his gristmill ca. 1800.

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Sarah Hermann
Site of Government Buildings #38

Buildings were constructed on this site between ca. 1729 and ca. 1828 to serve a variety of county functions. A reconstructed wood frame marks the location today, at the intersection of Richmond Road, Arthur Kill Road, and Richmond Hill Road.

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Sarah Hermann
Town Bridge #39

The stone arch Town Bridge passes over Richmond Creek, connecting Arthur Kill Road and Richmond Hill Road. The current structure, composed of dressed fieldstone, was erected in 1845 and is the only remaining 19th-century stone arch bridge on Staten Island. It connects two of the oldest roads on Staten Island.

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Sarah Hermann
Hemsley Hall #40

Hemsley Hall is located at 980 Richmond Hill Road. It is used by the Church of St. Andrew and is also available as space for community functions.

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Sarah Hermann
Saint Andrew's Church #41

Anglicans established the Church of St. Andrew at the head of the Fresh Kills in the early 18th century. A graveyard and church were begun by 1709 and the stone church building completed in 1712, adding a major institutional presence to the growing hamlet of Richmond. The church was granted its charter by Queen Anne in 1713.

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Sarah Hermann